A University of Illinois animal science professor who has pioneered how swine nutrition affects the reproductive system of sows is receiving a national honor today.

James Pettigrew will receive the American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Fellow Award for his research accomplishments at the ASAS National Awards Program in Indianapolis, IN.

Pettigrew has 37 years of experience studying how different feed ingredients affect swine health and resistance to disease. His work has encompassed the potential benefits of feed ingredients, such as soybean hulls, spray-dried eggs, rice and cereal grains.

 

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His research shows that changes in nutrition can affect the immune, reproductive and respiratory systems in swine. The swine industry makes use of his research to improve nutrition and health in swine herds.

Pettigrew’s research also involves the use of alternative antimicrobials, such as zinc oxide and copper, on commercial swine operations. Because of his knowledge of antimicrobials, he has served on a World Health Organization panel.

His productive research career has led to 430 invited presentations in 35 countries, 106 journal articles and 10 book chapters. His research has contributed to the 10th edition of Nutrient Requirements of Swine.

In the late 1990s, Pettigrew used his swine expertise to form Pettigrew Consulting International, LLC.

Pettigrew has served on the ASAS Board of Directors and as president of the Midwest Section. He is currently chair of the Federation of Animal Science Societies Science Policy Committee.

Pettigrew received his bachelors of science degree from Southern Illinois University, followed by a masters degree from Iowa State University and a PhD degree from the University of Illinois.  

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