The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) has released the “Small Enterprise Swine Operations in the United States 2007.”

The objective of the survey was to describe the health and management practices of operations with fewer than 100 pigs.

Participants included states at risk for exposure to feral swine and transmission of classical swine fever (hog cholera) and pseudorabies. Thirty-one states participated, accounting for 88.3% of swine and 84.4% of operations with fewer than 100 pigs nationally.

Results of the study showed:

--Overall, one third of operations (38.9%) had sows or gilts for breeding, but only 28.6% of small operations had sows or gilts for breeding on July 1, 2007, compared with at least two-thirds of medium and large operations.

--Overall, litters produced from July 2006 through June 2007 included an average of 8.8 piglets, 8.0 born alive and 7.3 weaned.

--Overall, nearly 24% of operations included the presence of feral swine in their counties. One-half of operations in the south contained the presence of feral swine in their counties, a much higher percentage than elsewhere.

Access the report on the NAHMS web site.

A CD of NAHMS reports is also available by contacting Anne Berry of NAHMS by phone (970) 494-7243, fax (970) 494-7229 or e-mailing anne.I.berry@aphis.usda.gov.