After years of development and research, on February 26, Canada announced that regulations were officially put into place instituting a national pig traceability system throughout the country.

Health of Animal Regulations, which have been published in the Canada Gazette, Part II, are regulations for a hog tracking system, which documents whenever an animal is moved from place-to-place.

Jeff Clark, the manager of PigTrace Canada, noted that the need for a mandatory traceability program first took shape in 2002, when producers worried that a large scale disease breakout could hit the Canadian hog industry.

He noted that the traceability system is a great tool to have in place, especially right now when most of Canada, as well as the U.S., is dealing with outbreaks of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV).

 

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"Any movement of pigs from one facility to another must be reported," Clark said, adding that records must be submitted on both the end of the shipper, as well as the mover.

Two separate parties reporting the pigs whereabouts allows for a double check to see if there are any errors in the system, Clark said.

"First and foremost the traceability program was built for emergency response" Clark said, adding that what took producers and veterinarian’s days and weeks to diagnose concerning PEDV, would only take a minute in the future.

Essentially the program is not only saving producers time, but money as well.

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