Alltech’s Young Scientist Program Hopes to Attract 50,000

[Fresno, California]- With a growing need for natural animal health solutions, global animal health company, Alltech announced the launch of its annual Young Scientist Program today. Growing by leaps and bounds, past programs featured only undergraduate students, but expanded last year to include graduate students. This year the program is expanding once again as Africa and the Middle East will have their own local competition as well as adding an additional phase to the program.

“Our desire to have this program continually grow will encourage students interested in the field of animal science as well as continue our dedication to young people and research,” said Alltech president and founder, Dr. Pearse Lyons. “From the first year, our rate of applicants has grown from 75 to a couple thousand. We hope to have 50,000 potential ‘young scientists’ for our 5th annual program.”

“By winning the Alltech Young Scientist Award I have developed skills I will use in the professional world and it proved to be a worthwhile opportunity,” said Tung Che, the 2009 graduate student winner.

The winner of the 2009 undergraduate award, Fan Liu said “I really wish more and more college students could participate in the Alltech Young Scientist competition. It will be a valuable experience for everyone.”

California is one of the top three states for AYS contestants, with entries of 10 in 2007 jumping to over 100 in 2009.

Craig Louder, a student at Utah State University, won in 2008 with his paper entitled, “The Estrogenic Mycotoxin Zearalenone and its Importance in Livestock Production.”

Louder is the second student from the West Coast to win the YAS award. The first was Rebekah Mast of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in 2005. The West Coast has doubled the number of students in the YAS competition since 2006.

“The Alltech Young Scientist Award has given me and others like me an opportunity to begin leaving the shores of the classroom and wading into the waters of professional research,” said Craig Louder. “It has been a tremendous learning experience and I encourage any student who is interested in science to take advantage of this opportunity.”

To participate, students must write a scientific paper based on a topic about animal feed technologies. Undergraduate students’ papers must be 3000 words in length and graduate students’ papers must be 5000 words in length. The first phase of the program will include a competition within each competing country. The winners of each local competition will move on to a regional phase and the regional winners will compete in the global phase. In the local and regional phase, papers in languages other than English will be accepted. Winners that enter the global phase will have their work translated into English, if necessary. Students can register at www.alltechyoungscientist.com. The deadline for submission is February 26, 2010.

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